Learning Objectives For AP Chemistry - Big Idea 2

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LO 2.1 Students can predict properties of substances based on their chemical formulas, and provide explanations of their properties based on particle views.

LO 2.2 The student is able to explain the relative strengths of acids and bases based on molecular structure, interparticle forces, and solution equilibrium.

LO 2.3 The student is able to use aspects of particulate models (i.e., particle spacing, motion, and forces of attraction) to reason about observed differences between solid and liquid phases and among solid and liquid materials.

LO 2.4 The student is able to use KMT and concepts of intermolecular forces to make predictions about the macroscopic properties of gases, including both ideal and nonideal behaviors.

LO 2.5 The student is able to refine multiple representations of a sample of matter in the gas phase to accurately represent the effect of changes in macroscopic properties on the sample.

LO 2.6 The student can apply mathematical relationships or estimation to determine macroscopic variables for ideal gases.

LO 2.7 The student is able to explain how solutes can be separated by chromatography based on intermolecular interactions.

LO 2.8 The student can draw and/or interpret representations of solutions that show the interactions between the solute and solvent.

LO 2.9 The student is able to create or interpret representations that link the concept of molarity with particle views of solutions.

LO 2.10 The student can design and/or interpret the results of a separation experiment (filtration, paper chromatography, column chromatography, or distillation) in terms of the relative strength of interactions among and between the components.

LO 2.11 The student is able to explain the trends in properties and/or predict properties of samples consisting of particles with no permanent dipole on the basis of London dispersion forces.

LO 2.12 The student can qualitatively analyze data regarding real gases to identify deviations from ideal behavior and relate these to molecular interactions.

LO 2.13 The student is able to describe the relationships between the structural features of polar molecules and the forces of attraction between the particles.

LO 2.14 The student is able to apply Coulombís Law qualitatively (including using representations) to describe the interactions of ions, and the attractions between ions and solvents to explain the factors that contribute to the solubility of ionic compounds.

LO 2.15 The student is able to explain observations regarding the solubility of ionic solids and molecules in water and other solvents on the basis of particle views that include intermolecular interactions and entropic effects.

LO 2.16 The student is able to explain the properties (phase, vapor pressure, viscosity, etc.) of small and large molecular compounds in terms of the strengths and types of intermolecular forces.

LO 2.17 The student can predict the type of bonding present between two atoms in a binary compound based on position in the periodic table and the electronegativity of the elements.

LO 2.18 The student is able to rank and justify the ranking of bond polarity on the basis of the locations of the bonded atoms in the periodic table.

LO 2.19 The student can create visual representations of ionic substances that connect the microscopic structure to macroscopic properties, and/or use representations to connect the microscopic structure to macroscopic properties (e.g., boiling point, solubility, hardness, brittleness, low volatility, lack of malleability, ductility, or conductivity).

LO 2.20 The student is able to explain how a bonding model involving delocalized electrons is consistent with macroscopic properties of metals (e.g., conductivity, malleability, ductility, and low volatility) and the shell model of the atom.

LO 2.21 The student is able to use Lewis diagrams and VSEPR to predict the geometry of molecules, identify hybridization, and make predictions about polarity.

LO 2.22 The student is able to design or evaluate a plan to collect and/or interpret data needed to deduce the type of bonding in a sample of a solid.

LO 2.23 The student can create a representation of an ionic solid that shows essential characteristics of the structure and interactions present in the substance.

LO 2.24 The student is able to explain a representation that connects properties of an ionic solid to its structural attributes and to the interactions present at the atomic level.

LO 2.25 The student is able to compare the properties of metal alloys with their constituent elements to determine if an alloy has formed, identify the type of alloy formed, and explain the differences in properties using particulate level reasoning.

LO 2.26 Students can use the electron sea model of metallic bonding to predict or make claims about the macroscopic properties of metals or alloys.

LO 2.27 The student can create a representation of a metallic solid that shows essential characteristics of the structure and interactions present in the substance.

LO 2.28 The student is able to explain a representation that connects properties of a metallic solid to its structural attributes and to the interactions present at the atomic level.

LO 2.29 The student can create a representation of a covalent solid that shows essential characteristics of the structure and interactions present in the substance.

LO 2.30 The student is able to explain a representation that connects properties of a covalent solid to its structural attributes and to the interactions present at the atomic level.

LO 2.31 The student can create a representation of a molecular solid that shows essential characteristics of the structure and interactions present in the substance.

LO 2.32 The student is able to explain a representation that connects properties of a molecular solid to its structural attributes and to the interactions present at the atomic level.



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Last edited January 17, 2018 6:38 am (diff)
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